Anti - Bullying

Anti-bullying Policy

INTRODUCTION 

Bullying is an insidious social problem. Headteachers have a legal duty to prevent bullying, but ultimately it is the responsibility of the whole school community to eradicate bullying by ensuring the development of a caring and supportive ethos. 

The following principles underlie our school policy: 

WHAT IS BULLYING? 

There is no legal definition of bullying. However, it’s usually defined as behaviour that is:

It takes many forms and can include:

 

It is not only the bullying behaviour which should be considered.  Account should also be taken of the bully’s intentions and of how the bullying is perceived by the victim.  Apparently harmless name-calling may be intended but could be experienced as traumatic by the victim.  Bullying can also include behaviour intended to secure material benefit.

 ATTITUDES TO BULLYING 

Adults and children often experience intense and conflicting emotions when confronted with bullying.  Our response to bullying is more likely to be consistent, coherent and productive if these feelings are acknowledged, brought into the open and worked through. Bullying is not openly condoned in society, but strength tends to be admired and weakness ridiculed.  It has been suggested that bullying is part of the educational system and is part of character development.

 However 

DETECTING BULLYING 

Parents and teachers need to be able to recognise the signs of distress which may indicate that a child is being bullied: 

 

 

ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY SCHOOL 

Action to be taken when it is suspected that an incident of bullying has taken place: 

In cases of serious bullying:

ADVICE FOR CHILDREN 

Most victims are passive children who lack strength and self-confidence, they may also be unpopular, although these characteristics may be as a result of them being bullied.  We must do our best to ensure the safety of these children.  They are not responsible for being bullied, but the actions they take do influence whether or not the bullying continues.  They should be advised as follows. 

STRATEGIES THAT MAY BE EMPLOYED BY STAFF 

CHILDREN WHO BULLY

To deal with these children, the following strategies might be employed:

THE ROLE OF THE BYSTANDER

Always make a note of the names of other children who are present when bullying takes place.  These children might unsettled, frightened or impressed.  They may be relieved that they are not the focus of the attack and may encourage the bullying of someone else.  Bystanders should be interviewed as well as children directly involved in any bullying situation.

An audience can be a key component of bullying.  The bully may wish to impress the audience.  Bystanders should show they disapprove of the behaviour, that they will take no part in it and should be encouraged to tell a teacher or adult what has happened.  If onlookers know what to do, they will be more likely to help the victim.  If a non-bullying ethos is established, children will not be bystanders, but will take action to stop the bullying. 

PREVENTING BULLYING

Responses to bullying should aim at prevention as well as control.  It is important that the school ethos does not encourage reliance on power and strength.  Our whole school approach to behaviour and discipline emphasises positive expectations regarding behaviour so that unacceptable behaviour will be marginalised.  This implies a whole school strategy involving:- 

 

BULLYING AT CLASS LEVEL

Bullying may be prevalent in groups.  The more children who are involved, the more legitimate it is likely to appear and the less likely it is that any one child will feel responsible.  If bullying is widespread in a class, children who have not taken part should be offered support and encouragement. 

It is important that:

 

Review

Governors are free to determine the renewal of this policy at any time, in line with changes in school systems or statutory guidance.